Bakithi Kumalo of Paul Simon Band: Free Bass Clinic

Bakithi Kumalo of The Paul Simon band

FREE Bass Clinic & Performance, Friday, November 9th, 2018 at 7pm!

 

The Bakithi Kumalo event has limited seating, reserve your seat: https://www.themusicden.com/topic/event-rsvp

The Music Den will also be giving away some free goodies to those in attendance via contest entry, so make sure you enter your name when you come to the clinic.

Bakithi (pronounced Bah-gee-tee Koo-ma-low) recently performed with The Paul Simon Band on Saturday Night Live on October 13th, 2018
 
In 1985, Kumalo was introduced to Paul Simon by producer Hendrick Lebone during the sessions for Simon’s Graceland album. Kumalo traveled with Simon to New York to finish the sessions, and after the accompanying concert tour, “spent several years commuting between Soweto and New York City” before permanently settling in the United States. Kumalo has toured regularly with Simon since then. He has also released several solo records, and continued to perform as a session musician with artists such as Joan Baez, Cyndi Lauper, Herbie Hancock, Tedeschi Trucks Band, Randy Brecker, Grover Washington Jr., and Mickey Hart.

 

Paul Simon live on Saturday Night Live, October 13th, 2018 with Bakithi Kumalo on bass duties:

 

bakithi kumalo
Free Bass Clinic 11/9 with Bakithi Kumalo at The Music Den
We hope to see you at the clinic – this is a great opportunity to gain inspiration through one of the most amazing stories you’ll have heard all year.

 

Bakithi endorses Phil Jones Bass amps – which we carry at The Music Den! NS Design, Pigtronix Pedals (also available at The Music Den), Kala (also available at The Music Den) Ukulele Basses, Lathon Basswear, Xotic Bass Guitars, and La Bella Strings

Bakithi’s bio:

Bakithi Kumalo’s musical career has been characterized by a series of serendipitous events, ranging from his debut gig as a precocious seven-year-old filling in for the bassist in his uncle’s band to his enlistment into Paul Simon’s group during the recording sessions of the pop star’s landmark Graceland album in 1985.

Kumalo creates a singular electric fretless bass sound teeming with double stops that sound like human voices and the African grooves of his homeland, which has garnered him a stellar reputation as a sideman. In addition to touring with Simon, he’s also recorded and/or toured with Gloria Estefan, Derrick Trucks and Susan Tedeschi, Chico Ceasar, Laurie Anderson, Gerald Albright, Miriam Makeba, Randy Brecker, Grover Washington Jr., Bob James, Angelique Kidjo, Jon Secada, Josh Groban and Chris Botti.

“Growing up amidst traditional African music and listening to popular American music on the radio, Bakithi fuses these elements with intuitive rhythmic and harmonic complexity. He exudes worldliness with his playing, seamlessly jumping from African rhythms to Latin feels, bossa nova grooves, odd time signatures, and American pop, jazz, and soul.”  – Bass Players to Know: Bakithi Kumalo by Ryan Madora 6.6.14

 

“(Paul) Simon is extremely articulate in describing both the writing of the lyrics and their synchronization with the bass (played by Kumalo), which, given the music’s light skipping beat of South African mbaqanga, proved to be more a more reliable foundation than the drums.”   –  The New York Times Movie* Review 2012
*‘Under African Skies’ (documentary about the Paul Simon Album ‘Graceland’)

Kumalo has also been active as a solo artist, with five fine albums to his credit — 1998’s San’ Bonan, 2000’s In Front of My Eyes, 2008’s Transmigration, 2011’s Change, and 2016’s After All These Years.

Kumalo’s bass-playing history began in Soweto where he grew up surrounded by music. His mother sang in a church choir and his uncle, a saxophone player, was always at his house rehearsing his band. “Every weekend, everyone would be at my house singing and playing all day,” Kumalo says. “Plus there were bands on every block of my neighborhood. So, music surrounded me. There was traditional African rhythmic music as well as a cappella vocal groups. I picked up the bass early and realized I could follow the groove of a tune with it. I could play the bass lines from a cappella music, and I learned how to develop lines based on the left-hand work of accordion players in the township bands.”

However, it was an 18-month road trip with his uncle’s band to Zululand when he was 14 that helped to solidify his bass voice. The band gigged as well as played at schools and hospitals, but got stranded there. During that downtime, Kumalo had a dream where he saw someone playing, using his thumb in a particular way. That set him on the path of bass discovery.

Kumalo says it wasn’t until later that he heard the fretless sound by people like Stanley Clarke, Marcus Miller and Victor Bailey. “And, of course, there was Jaco Pastorius,” he says. “I heard him, and I thought, hey, that’s like me.”

While Kumalo became a professional at an early age in his uncle’s band, life in apartheid South Africa posed many challenges; so many, in fact, that Kumalo began to look for work outside the music field. However, a producer friend introduced him to Simon, whose music he was largely unfamiliar with. Despite his nervousness in meeting the American pop star in a studio setting, Kumalo says Simon immediately gravitated to his bass style.  Kumalo’s work on Graceland opened the doors for him to pursue other avenues, including recordings with Herbie Hancock, Randy Brecker and Cyndi Lauper.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *